Steam Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami

Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami

Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami is a movie starring Grace Jones, Lowell 'Sly' Dunbar, and Jean-Paul Goude. Larger than life, wild, scary and androgynous - Grace Jones plays all these parts. Yet here we also discover her as a lover,...

Other Titles
Grace Jones, zyciodajne swiatlo, Amazing Grace, Grace Jones, Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami - Das Leben einer Ikone, Ikonet Grace Jones, Grace Jones. La pantera del Pop, Grejs Džons, La vie en Grace Jones
Running Time
1 hours 55 minutes
Quality
480p, 720p, 1080p, 2K, 4K
Genres
Biography, Music, Documentary
Director
Sophie Fiennes
Actors
Lowell 'Sly' Dunbar, Jean-Paul Goude, Grace Jones, Marjorie Jones
Country
UK, Ireland
Year
2017
Audio Languages
日本語, اللغة_العربية, English, Deutsch, Français, Italiano, Español, Svenska, Gaeilge, Nederlands
Subtitles
Japanese, اللغة_العربية, Čeština, Tiếng Việt, Português, 한국어, Australia, Filipino, हिन्दी

Larger than life, wild, scary and androgynous - Grace Jones plays all these parts. Yet here we also discover her as a lover, daughter, mother, sister and even grandmother, as she submits herself to our gaze and allows us to understand what constitutes her mask. The stage is where her most extreme embodiments are realised and her theatrical imagination lets loose: this is where the musical of her life is played out. The film includes Grace's unique performances singing iconic hits such as Slave To The Rhythm, Pull Up To The Bumper, as well as the more recent autobiographical tracks Williams' Bloods and Hurricane. These personal songs also link to Grace's family life, as the film takes us on a holiday road trip across Jamaica, where her family roots and the story of her traumatic childhood are uncovered. In Jamaican patois, 'Bloodlight' is the red light that illuminates when an artist is recording and 'Bami' means bread, the substance of daily life. Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami weaves together the layers of Grace Jones' public and private life, as she moves effortlessly between different facets: she is gypsy, artist and partying hedonist, warm and funny but also a fierce and tenacious businesswoman. The performance continues to move thematically though the film, with Love Is The Drug acting like an aria, bringing the film to its final and most touching scenes. This is a Grace we have not seen before, someone who reminds us of what it is to dare to be truly alive.

Comments about biography «Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami» (15)

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Kathryn

When I heard that I was going to see a documentary about Grace Jones, I was interested in the story. I had heard a lot about her and was curious about the story behind the legend. I found this film to be very interesting and informative. I didn't get the feeling of a documentary, more like a documentary about Grace Jones. I think the story itself is amazing, and it was interesting to see the many different versions of the story. I really enjoyed the documentary and the interviews with many of the people who were close to her. This documentary really made me feel like I was part of this story and that I was in the same room with Grace Jones. This documentary really gives me a better understanding of what Grace Jones was like and how she inspired so many people. It really made me think about the different versions of the story and it made me feel like I was part of the story. I definitely recommend this documentary.

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Crystal D.

This documentary is well worth watching, and all I will say is that it deserves the attention it is getting. The voice-over narration was a real bother, and some of the nitty-gritty was left out of the editing. However, even with those things, it is a compelling and well-made documentary that you will want to watch. The content of the film, which is mostly focused on the current events of the issue of homosexuality in Iraq and Afghanistan, is also one of the best I've seen on the topic. I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in these issues and would like to see some of the current problems. Another reviewer mentioned the overall film was a bit depressing. That was also true. I would agree that it was a bit depressing at times, but I also found it rather thought-provoking. It is only a film and it was never intended to be an all-encompassing or comprehensive look at the situation in Iraq and Afghanistan. I also found it was only mildly disturbing at times. This documentary was not meant to make you cry. I would suggest watching it alone at night or when you want to be taken away by something different. I would also suggest watching it with some background on the current situation in Iraq and Afghanistan. I would also suggest watching it with your family. You will be in a much better position to understand the arguments and the issues and also to see a little more of what the United States and the world has to offer for the Muslim community. I do hope that this documentary was a bit of a disappointment to some people. I know that it was a big success to a lot of people who saw it, but I believe it did serve a purpose to the Arab and Muslim communities in the United States and other Western countries.

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Russell Webb

The history of music and the blues has always been a fascination to me, and I knew nothing about this story until I watched the documentary. This film follows the story of one of the most important musicians in American history and shows how he began to change his style as he got older, and how he went from being a blues fanatic to a blues master. The film is told through interviews with musicians, family members and friends, and the filmmaker's observations of the musicians' music. The music in the film is from the 1920's through the 1950's. There is no attempt to make it sound contemporary. The music is told through the stories of the musicians themselves and the music that they are still able to play. The documentary is well-made and well-acted. The filmmakers have a good sense of the music and the people involved and have done a very good job at telling the story of the music. I would definitely recommend this film to anyone who is interested in music history.

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Sandra A.

I remember seeing this documentary when I was a kid and being really moved by it. However, as an adult, it still has an impact on me. I find the documentary and the film that it was based on (Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami) to be very well-made and quite thought-provoking. However, for me, the real shock value comes from the interviews with the musicians and producers involved in the making of the music. The testimonies are fascinating and there is never a dull moment. The documentary takes a closer look at the music and the people involved in its creation, and I really think that it is important to know about the music before you go into the film. If you don't, you may be left wondering what it all means and how it all came about. The film does a great job at showing the artistic side of the music, the people involved and the music itself, and it does it in a way that is really informative and entertaining. It is a very interesting documentary that is worth watching and even if you don't like music, it will still be very interesting to know what went into making the music that we hear and the people who are involved in making it. I recommend it to anyone who likes music and/or has an interest in the music industry and/or music documentaries.

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Harry J.

I didn't expect to be as moved by this film as I was. I thought it was going to be a typical doco about the troubled and troubled lives of some drug addicted drug dealers but it turned out to be an outstanding piece of documentary that touched on a lot of interesting topics. By the end of the movie I was left with a feeling of sadness for many of the drug addicts because they had nothing to live for, were in jail, and died prematurely because they got addicted to drugs and could not live without it. It is a must watch for anyone who likes to watch documentaries about people of substance abuse because it is powerful and very honest. One of the reasons I liked this documentary so much was that it made me feel that the main character, while struggling with his life, was still looking for something in life but nothing seems to be there for him. He is tired, he feels empty, and he is not even sure what to do with himself. His friend tries to show him the possibilities and the problems that are out there for him and all he can do is try to look for a job. He does not know what he is going to do next and he is not sure that he even wants to do anything. I also felt for the drug addicts because I thought that they were fighting for their life, dying prematurely because they were addicted to drugs. I was not surprised at all when I found out that the movie had won an award for best documentary and it is the best documentary ever made.

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Paul

Film maker Michael Moore has finally gone into the arena of addressing the Afghanistan War in his new film 'Haters.' Moore goes into great detail on the suffering of Afghani people, and the innocent American soldiers who are leaving their families behind. We have several celebrities discussing how people should be protesting the war, and everyone will agree that this movie is entertaining. But the documentary doesn't end with thanking the people of Afghanistan for fighting for freedom and democracy. Moore takes on some of the politicians who have been involved with the war, and we see their hypocrisy, greed, and power. Moore also points out that some people are trying to exploit the conflict for financial gain. We see how some organizations such as the Chamber of Commerce have tried to profit from this war, and how they have an incentive to see the war on the same level as the capitalist system. It's amazing to see how much greed is involved in how the war is being fought. In conclusion, Moore's movies are the perfect vehicle for the message he wants to get across. 'Haters' is the best film of his that he's made so far, and it's a good example of how a true documentary should be. I hope that this movie is able to get the message across to a broader audience.

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Christopher Jackson

This movie chronicles the struggles of a gifted young woman in the Soviet Union, who was released from prison in the mid 1980's to a shattered family life. When her father dies, Grace is then separated from her mother and emotionally depleted, her brother and father abandon her. She also lives in the shadow of her biological father, who tried to take her away, and is deeply disturbed. She spends a lot of time in the company of a black-haired companion (played by Sasha Grey) and comes to hate her younger brother. Her friends and neighbors come and go, and her grandmother is obnoxiously drunk. Eventually, she is able to start over in a small rural town in the Czech Republic, and finds love and happiness with a white-haired Hungarian man. While Grace has suffered her entire life, this woman was able to break free from her world of trauma. By depicting the relationship between a person who was once abused and punished, and a person who was once happy, I was able to understand Grace's freedom. I appreciated the actress playing the character of Grace in the movie, and the life that Grace's family had in the Soviet Union. Grace's story was extremely relatable, and I found myself wanting to read her book. Although I will not give the movie away, I felt the director did a very good job of explaining the reasons for the abuse and punishment, and how Grace gained her love. I believe this movie is very interesting, and you should be able to appreciate the story in depth. I would recommend it to anyone, and would like to see the story of another victim of such abuse. I believe this is a must-see movie, especially for people who are interested in the filmography of a woman who had her life very much taken away from her.

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Crystal

I agree with most of the other reviews on this film. It has a very sad story to tell, especially to those of us who have lost loved ones. But it is beautifully filmed. It captures the atmosphere of the seventies in a way I didn't expect. I would recommend it to anyone who wants to know what it was like. It was like a cinematic version of the AIDS crisis. This is not a movie that I could watch over and over again. It took a while for me to get it, but it was worth the wait.

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Walter

First off, I've seen this film a few times now. It's been a long time since I've been to a theatre, but I've never been so disinterested watching a film. This film is a great example of how a documentary should be done. It was too long, so I shortened it, which I think saved me from having to stay up until the very end. The thing that has stood out to me the most is that despite all the protests, despite all the people that were against this film, that this was exactly what it was going to be about, and that it was a tribute to the music of Nirvana. What would you like to see in a documentary? Please don't fall into the trap that a lot of people do and think a documentary should just be the characters talking about themselves. If you get to a point where you're talking about yourself, you need to get out of the film and ask for help! That's why we see documentaries. We don't want to be there. We don't want to be the narrator. We want to just be there. They even show the message that Kurt Cobain wrote for Nirvana. For those that haven't heard it yet, it's 'we are the way, and the truth will set us free'. He didn't write it, but he still said it. I highly recommend this film, it's a great example of how you could use a documentary to change your life, and how a documentary could be one of the most powerful things you could do, without being preachy or boring, and you could do it for free! Go see this movie!

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Jacqueline Soto

With a good soundtrack and outstanding performances by a cast that's actually good, this documentary will bring some tears to your eyes. Great soundtrack and the music is very haunting. There's a real sense of place. The Mexican city of Bami is a cultural crossroads, one that you can explore if you choose to do so. The city is like many other cities around the world that have shaped themselves around a particular people and culture. It's also where the genesis of the biggest drug war in the world is based on the history of the revolution, and the memories of the Mexican people. By watching the documentary you can understand why the revolution has taken place, and you can also understand how important the drug war has been for Mexico. You will learn that the battle has been part of the history of the country, and will see how it's being fought in the present day. The people you will meet are very insightful, and what you can see of their lives is fascinating. Watch this documentary and learn about the history of Mexico, and its people and their struggles, and the life of the people who live in the city of Bami, or anywhere that is culturally influenced by the country and culture of the country.

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Shirley H.

Although both Grace Jones (in Brazil, and in London) and Robert Johnson (in America) were pioneer singer and songwriters of their respective countries, neither of them have been well-known to a majority of the world, until now. How, this myth of two extraordinary women actually became legend, is the focus of this documentary, which we have prepared, and which we hope to show, in many countries, because this subject is very interesting and relevant. Just imagine, you are on the street, you have something to do, and you see two women standing in front of you, singing and talking. That is the context of this film, that a history of two women, who left their country of origin, and got in touch with America, and made that country famous. The docu-drama introduces us to the time and place of the women, their lives, and their music, and the story of how they managed to make their country famous, in an historical context. We get to hear the stories of the two women, and of their music, and the influence of their country on world music. It is a fascinating documentary, you will have a great time watching this, because it is well-made, very interesting, and a must-see. What more could you want from a docu-drama?

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Jessica

I watched this documentary on YouTube and I am surprised how much it touched me. It's a story of a girl's struggle in a war torn country. She came from a distant place to be a guinea pig. Her son was killed by the dictator of the country, and she is now just a quiet girl. There's a lot of interviews with the people who came with her. Her family didn't really have a choice but to let her go to Guinea because there were no doctors to help her. The rebels, the government, the rebels, the rebels. It is really hard to watch what happens to these people. It was very brave of the girl to come with her family. She was the only one who was the courage to stand up and do something about it. It's a very hard documentary to watch, especially the interviews. I can't find the words to express how much it affected me. It's a touching documentary that shows how brave people can be when there is no choice.

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Eric M.

Grace Jones is a woman who in a very odd way is a cross between David Bowie and Bruce Springsteen. Born in Baghdad, she left in 1956, and never set foot on American soil again. Grace was killed in Baghdad when an RPG hit her convoy, and although she was severely wounded, she lived for three years in a Sunni-controlled area of Iraq. She didn't leave a note for anyone, except for one man who saved her from a falling land mine. She was never given an Islamic burial, and although she was survived by her mother, and a few old friends, she is not remembered in her homeland or any other Arab culture. She was married to a well-known journalist, but she is no more. This movie is, however, a fascinating look at the life of a woman whose life is irrevocably linked to her birthplace and what happened to her and the people around her. The director is making a very powerful point: the plight of women in Iraq was ignored by the West, and the entire region became a criminal mess. People had almost no civil rights, and it was a place where child marriages, adultery, and women's sexual freedom were very dangerous to women and children. It was a country where a woman was sexually assaulted every five minutes. It was a place where women were still virtually being forcibly married and only knew the word 'virgin' when the word 'bride' was used. The movie was shot in Baghdad, but was actually shot in Iran, where Grace was born and where her family lived. As an American woman, I have to say that I was surprised that she would have this kind of story to tell. She didn't leave her homeland because she was afraid to go home to find out what the condition of women in Iraq were, she left because her boyfriend was telling her that it was better to leave than to suffer in this hellhole. There is a lot of discussion about Iraq in this movie, and how American soldiers were more concerned with their soldiers' careers than their fellow soldiers. You see the American people coming into Iraq to rebuild a country that they did not even know existed, and one of them could tell you how it was the number one issue. You see a woman who leaves her husband, and then gives birth to a child who is very different than she was. You see the man who helps to give her a book on the Quran, and the man who accompanies her to the mosque. You see a woman who takes a gun and goes out and takes revenge on an old enemy. You see a man who is involved in a drug deal. You see the last family to be killed in the movie. You see Grace's reaction to this violence, and you get a feeling of what it must have been like when the whole world ignored her. She had to take her own life because of what she had to go through, and I found the movie so moving because it is so sad. I would recommend this movie to anyone, because it is a very sad, and sad that her life was marked by this, and what happened to her family is still going on in the world. This is a very beautiful movie, and I think it is a must-see for everyone. The director, Norman, has told us how the woman who was Grace Jones was and lived in a place where women were treated like children, and this documentary is a testimony to her. It was a strange kind of courage to have a photograph taken by the soldiers who came to her rescue, and show this picture to her husband and others. It was the photographer who got a US Army officer to sign a document that showed the American government recognized the woman as a war widow, and an honorable woman. If the US government is interested in finding out what happened to the women and their children, I would recommend this movie to anyone.

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Stephanie Alvarado

As a lifelong fan of the band's music, I really enjoyed this film. The documentary made me more aware of the group as a whole. I also found it interesting to see a life changing experience for the frontman of the band, David Bowie. I did not find the "Scream" story to be as impressive as some reviewers. The only other story that I found to be slightly enjoyable was about David's mother. The son of the deceased band member, was played by Jack White in the film. This story was a little bit different. Overall, I would recommend this documentary to fans of David Bowie, mainly because of his past but also because of his life changing experience.

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Sandra

Hoo-rah for director Lee Tamahori's acting to be deserving of an Oscar in a year when only four people have won it. "Hollywood" herself "Big Lebowski" director David Gordon Green has a very fine supporting role to play on which she is perfectly cast. There's a definite age divide when it comes to the other supporting players, from the elderly Helen Hunt, whose memory seems to be returning from the grave to the newcomer and modestly talented Kathleen Quinlan. But this is also a period piece when women weren't allowed to do anything (or just wear corsets) and the film is appropriately set in the 40's and 50's as well as from the perspective of a history-buff of the American West, as Lee Tamahori includes many street views and campy town setting. But I won't criticize the movie for that since it's really about how great an actor Grace Jones was in her 40's and 50's. Her performances as a sassy young girl who's harassed by the "respectable" people of her day and young girl who's less than shy in the company of the "respectable" people of her day, have to be the finest of her career. To this day she's made an impression on me. No wonder a lot of people have come to love her for her performance as "Lita Mackenzie" in "Sister Act" (1987). She even became a respectable actor after that. Overall the movie is a labor of love and a fine treat for film fans. At the time it was made, it was hardly a big hit and only one theater was showing it at its peak (wonder how much that has changed since). I saw the movie on VHS at a friend's house and the DVD (more recently). It's just another example of how a small group of people can make a huge difference and to celebrate the movie and Lee Tamahori, it's a perfect example of how a group of talented people can benefit from a collective effort. I recommend this to all those interested in the history of film and the history of actress Grace Jones. Rating 8 out of 10